Canadian woman uses own obituary to rail against fat-shaming

Ellen Maud Bennett called out the medical profession for only offering weight loss support after being diagnosed with cancer

A Canadian woman has employed her obituary to call out the medical profession for what she described as ” fat-shaming”, in a message urging society to better address the health concerns of overweight women.

Ellen Maud Bennett, 64, died in May, after she was diagnosed with terminal cancer in the west coast city of Victoria.

In an obituary be made available in the Times Colonist newspaper, Bennett’s household describes Bennett as a remarkable woman with an unforgettable character whose career spanned from a stint on Parliament Hill to television and film.

But the obituary also railed against how she had been treated when she tried medical assistance.

” A final message Ellen wanted to share was about the fat-shaming she suffered from the medical profession ,” it noted .

” Over the past few years of feeling unwell she attempted out medical intervention and no one offered any support or suggestions beyond weight loss ,” it continued.” Ellen’s dying wishing was that women of size stimulate her death matter by advocating strongly for their health and not accepting that fat is the only relevant health issue .”

Since it was published earlier this month, the obituary has hit a chord with many on social media, racking up shares and responses.

Some pointed to similar experiences.” It wasn’t until I started taking interest in my sister’s health as an adult and took her to my doctor that we find she had several ailments that had been untreated for years because physicians refused to treat her and maintained telling her to lose weight first ,” wrote one person on Twitter .

Another accused the focus on her weight of eclipsing a degenerative genetic condition. After a decade of being told to shed pounds, she was 43 years of age when she was finally properly diagnosed, she said, adding:” The medical community sucks for heavy females .”

Others argued that this kind of treatment often pushes people away from health care, including those who may already be marginalised from society.” My mother loathes going to the doctor because of the fat-shaming ,” wrote one man. He added:” She also had to stop going for walkings because randos in passing automobiles would lunge abuse at her .”

The obituary noted that she filled her last days with humour, love and requests for fresh lobster, peonies and the “perfect shrimp wonton soup”- and also recognised those who had treated her differently.

” Ellen’s household would like to extend our gratitude to the amazing squad of angels at the Victoria Hospice who devoted her the respect and kindness she required and deserved ,” it noted.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Canadian woman employs own obituary to rail against fat-shaming

Ellen Maud Bennett called out the medical profession for only offering weight loss support after being diagnosed with cancer

A Canadian woman has used her obituary to call out the medical profession for what she described as ” fat-shaming”, in a message urging society to better address the health concerns of overweight women.

Ellen Maud Bennett, 64, died in May, after she was diagnosed with terminal cancer in the west coast city of Victoria.

In an obituary be made available in the Times Colonist newspaper, Bennett’s family describes Bennett as a remarkable female with an unforgettable character whose career spanned from a stint on Parliament Hill to television and film.

But the obituary also railed against how she had been treated when she tried medical assistance.

” A final message Ellen wanted to share was about the fat-shaming she endured from the medical profession ,” it noted .

” Over the past few years of feeling unwell she attempted out medical intervention and no one offered any subsistence or suggestions beyond weight loss ,” it continued.” Ellen’s dying hope was that women of size stimulate her death matter by advocating strongly for their health and not accepting that fat is the only relevant health issue .”

Since it was published earlier this month, the obituary has hit a chord with many on social media, racking up shares and responses.

Some pointed to similar experiences.” It wasn’t until I started taking interest in my sister’s health as an adult and took her to my doctor that we determined she had several ailments that had been untreated for years because physicians refused to treat her and kept telling her to lose weight first ,” wrote one person on Twitter .

Another accused the focus on her weight of eclipsing a degenerative genetic condition. After a decade of being told to shed pounds, she was 43 years of age when she was finally properly diagnosed, she said, adding:” The medical community sucks for heavy women .”

Others argued that this kind of treatment often pushes people away from health care, including those who may already be marginalised from society.” My mother loathes going to the doctor because of the fat-shaming ,” wrote one human. He added:” She also had to stop going for strolls because randos in passing autoes would lunge abuse at her .”

The obituary noted that she filled her last days with humour, love and requests for fresh lobster, peonies and the “perfect shrimp wonton soup”- and also recognised those who had treated her differently.

” Ellen’s family would like to extend our gratitude to the amazing team of angels at the Victoria Hospice who gave her the respect and kindness she needed and deserved ,” it noted.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

‘ I was scared I’d get sick ‘: the pregnant migrant women detained by the US

Esther Ramos lost 20 pounds when she was sent to a Texas facility while pregnant and critics say experiences like hers are becoming more common

Esther Ramos was 16 years old and two months pregnant with her second child when she, her husband, Fredy Aldana, and their then 19 -month-old daughter, Milagro, intersected the border in Tijuana to seek asylum in the US on 13 January.

Upon entry into the San Ysidro border station, Esther and Milagro were separated from Aldana and they haven’t seen him since. Esther and her daughter spent three days in a Customs and Border Protection( CBP) holding cell, where she said she wasn’t offered any food on her first day and she barely ate during the next two days.

” They gave us burritos in the morning and at night and a small sandwich during the day, but I merely drank the juice because I was scared I would get sick- all of the food looked like it was prepared a really long time ago ,” Esther said.

Because she and her daughter are both under 18, they were then sent to a facility for unaccompanied minors in San Benito, Texas, where they were held for over two months. During her time in detention, as her pregnancy progressed, Esther lost 20 pounds.

Critics say experiences like Esther’s are becoming more common as pregnant migrants- whether minors like Esther or adults- are being detained in increasing numbers and for longer periods of time as the Trump administration cracks down on border crossings. Under the Obama administration, Migration and Customs Enforcement( Ice) had a policy of presumption of release for all pregnant women, except under “extraordinary circumstances”.

” Pregnant women shouldn’t be in detention, period ,” said Dr Ranit Mishori, an expert medical consultant for Physicians for Human Rights and professor of Family Medicine at Georgetown University School of Medicine, referring to the Trump administration’s decision to overrule the previous policy in March 2018.

In February, a 24 year-old Honduran detainee went into premature labor at the Point Isabel detention center in Texas and dedicated birth to a stillborn newborn. Ice later revealed that as many as 28 females had miscarried in their custody in the last two years.

Migrant proponents and pregnant asylum seekers waiting to cross the border in Tijuana have heard about the increase in miscarriages while in Ice custody.

” There have been anecdotes of women having miscarriages in detention and Ice policemen denying they were ever pregnant, so we’re offering pregnancy exams for those who want a record of their pregnancy ,” said Phil Canete, result coordinator for the Refugee Health Alliance, a clinic based in Tijuana.

Esther’s description of her time in detention offers a stark painting for a pregnant woman, especially one whose first infant had been born premature. Mishori said Esther being a minor also increases the risk for her second pregnancy.

Esther said that during the week she and the other detained minors at her facility were only given two meals a day.

On a typical weekday she was woken at 5am and given a prenatal vitamin that made her nauseous. At 6am she had breakfast, and at 7am she and her daughter were separated for the working day and she went to class until 4pm. She said some teachers brought them a snack of apples or pears, but on most days she said she didn’t eat again until dinner at 5pm.

“[ Esther] didn’t receive adequate nutrition and that’s very regarding and can affect her and plainly the fetus ,” said Mishori.

Esther suffered from daily nausea and vomiting, which Mishori said is common for the first trimester, but that it’s vital pregnant women continue gaining weight.

In addition to being hungry, Esther recalled constant fatigue, as she was often not allowed to return to her room to rest between her 5am wakeup and her 10 pm bedtime.

” When you think about a woman in that first trimester it’s a period of very great physiological changes that often cause girls to be more tired ,” Mishori said.

In a statement to the Guardian, Patrick Fisher, a spokesman for the Department of Health and Human Services’s Administration for Children and Household, said that every child in custody receives” three meals a day plus snacks” in addition to other services such as medical and mental healthcare, education and recreation.

Esther said that during her time in detention she was taken to three medical visits, and at the second visit she was given an ultrasound and told her baby was a girl. She said the doctors did not mention her weight loss as a number of problems but did tell her she needed to be drinking a lot of water, which was readily available in the facility.

Despite having several family members in the US prepared to be her sponsor, it took two months for Esther to be released.

Esther and Aldana decided to flee Honduras because a group of narco-traffickers started killing Aldana’s family members one by one after his brother refused to hand over his small plot of land. They traveled by foot and bus with the migrant caravan to reach the US-Mexico border, where they waited two months for their chance to turn themselves in.

Aldana was transferred to a detention center in Louisiana where he has been for more than seven months away. Esther said her daughter and husband have always been close but they became especially attached in their last month together because he was always the one holding her; he didn’t want any heavy lifting to hurt Esther’s pregnancy.

” When he calls, I hold the phone to Milagro’s ear so she can hear him, but she doesn’t say anything, she merely cries ,” Esther said.

They both hope he’s released from detention before her newborn is due next month, but they have no idea if that will happen.

About Esther and her time in detention, Mishori said she ticks a lot of boxes of some of the most vulnerable people: being a woman, pregnant, having a child and being a child herself.

“ So, that’s sort of the big picture here, that she shouldn’t have been in detention at all ,” Mishori said. This reporting was supported by the International Women’s Media Foundation’s Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice in the Americas .

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Canadian woman utilizes own obituary to rail against fat-shaming

Ellen Maud Bennett called out the medical profession for only offering weight loss support after being diagnosed with cancer

A Canadian woman has use her obituary to call out the medical profession for what she described as ” fat-shaming”, in a message urging society to better address the health concerns of overweight women.

Ellen Maud Bennett, 64, died in May, after she was diagnosed with terminal cancer in the west coast city of Victoria.

In an obituary be made available in the Times Colonist newspaper, Bennett’s household describes Bennett as a remarkable woman with an unforgettable character whose career spanned from a stint on Parliament Hill to television and film.

But the obituary also railed against how she had been treated when she sought medical help.

” A final message Ellen wanted to share was about the fat-shaming she suffered from the medical profession ,” it noted .

” Over the past few years of feeling unwell she sought out medical intervention and no one offered any subsistence or suggestions beyond weight loss ,” it continued.” Ellen’s dying wish was that women of size induce her death matter by advocating strongly for their health and not accepting that fat is the only relevant health issue .”

Since it was published earlier this month, the obituary has struck a chord with many on social media, racking up shares and responses.

Some pointed to similar experiences.” It wasn’t until I started taking interest in my sister’s health as an adult and took her to my doctor that we received she had several ailments that had been untreated for years because physicians refused to treat her and kept telling her to lose weight first ,” wrote one person on Twitter .

Another accused the focus on her weight of eclipsing a degenerative genetic condition. After a decade of being told to shed pounds, she was 43 years of age when she was finally properly diagnosed, she said, adding:” The medical community sucks for heavy girls .”

Others argued that this kind of treatment often pushes people away from health care, including those who may already be marginalised from society.” My mother loathes going to the doctor because of the fat-shaming ,” wrote one man. He added:” She also had to stop going for walks because randos in passing cars would hurl abuse at her .”

The obituary noted that she filled her last days with humour, love and requests for fresh lobster, peonies and the “perfect shrimp wonton soup”- and also recognised those who had treated her differently.

” Ellen’s family would like to extend our gratitude to the amazing squad of angels at the Victoria Hospice who dedicated her the respect and kindness she needed and deserved ,” it noted.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

‘We is dying from sadness’: the fathers and sons reunited behind bars

A rare look inside an immigration prison uncovers the agony of indefinitely incarcerated families: poor schooling, little sleep, and no idea when they will get out

Eight-year-old Jorge Jr is withdrawn. He doesn’t lift his head up from the table for much of the hour-long visit at the immigrant detention center.

” He’s lost four pounds[ 1.8 kg] since we got here. He’s not the same child ,” said his father, Jorge.” The psychologist asked me if I wanted to give him any drug. I told them the best medicine is freedom. All we need is to be free .”

It’s been a traumatic few months for Jorge and Jorge Jr. After illegally crossing the Rio Grande into south Texas, the pair were arrested and separated by the US Border Patrol. Jorge Jr was sent to a shelter for a few months while his father was processed in the criminal justice system under zero tolerance, the subject of a major Guardian investigation this week, for illegal entry to the US. Though now reunited, the pair- and thousands of others like them- face a new horror: indefinite detention.

The Guardian satisfy three decides of reunited but incarcerated fathers and sons at the Karnes detention center, about an hour south-east of San Antonio, in early September: Hondurans Jorge and Jorge Jr and Franklin and Franklin Jr, as well as Elmer and his son Heyler from Guatemala. They are among the 800 “residents” at the prison where most children have been detained for far longer than the legal limit of 20 days.

” We’ve all been detained with our sons and have no idea when we’re getting out. I’ve been here with Franklin[ Jr] for 53 days. I’m counting every day ,” Franklin said in a subsequent phone interview- US Immigration and Customs Enforcement( Ice) forbids visitors’ record devices and notebooks from the detention centre.

All three households fled their home countries in fear and applied for political asylum when they were taken into immigration detention. While they were separated from their sons, the fathers failed the” believable dread” interview they need to pass to seek asylum, but are all appealing their cases.

” It was sell medications or be killed, so that’s when I decided to leave Honduras ,” Franklin said, referring to threats his son received from gangs near the capital, Tegucigalpa. He rode through Mexico on the roof of a shipment train dubbed La Bestia ( the animal) with his son strapped to him with his belt so he wouldn’t fall off.

Children
Children are led into a detention facility in Tornillo, Texas, during the height of the family separation crisis in June. Photograph: Mike Blake/ Reuters

Jorge left the Olancho region of Honduras for similar reasons.” It used to be nice but bad people turned up and started extorting, killing people, selling and trafficking medications. So many of us left ,” Jorge said.” I can’t mention names because if it comes out in the news bad things happen .”

” They want to kill me in Guatemala ,” Elmer said he told immigration policemen when he presented himself at the Roma, Texas, perimeter traversing asking for asylum. He was extorted by a gang that had already murdered his brother-in-law in his home town of El Chal in Guatemala’s Peten region.

” The officer told me there are murderers here, too. We aren’t going to give you asylum, we are going to separate you from your son .”

For a month, Elmer didn’t speak to his son or even know where he was.” They kidnapped him, that’s what they did ,” he said.

Incarceration of asylum seekers

Prior to zero tolerance this year, asylum seekers were typically released from detention as they pursued their asylum asserts. Today, unlawful perimeter crossers are criminally prosecuted before moving to immigration detention, even if they tell Border Patrol they are fleeing for their own lives. Getting bonded out or paroled is now much less likely.

While the parents were being processed, “their childrens” were sent thousands of miles away: Heyler and Jorge to New York, but Franklin does not know where Franklin Jr was sent.” They told me to a shelter in Texas. But he says he got on a plane, so I think they sent him to California ,” Franklin says.

The infants are struggling to cope with their incarceration. Franklin Jr wants to be outside playing with horses. In Honduras he used to watch his father train horses for dressage competitions.

Heyler describes the ” school ” within the detention center as just playing or watching television.” We don’t learn anything ,” he said.

Children
Children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes center. Photograph: Eric Gay/ AP

Sleep is hard to come by. Although each family has its own room, the parents say that guards do bed checks every 30 minutes during the night, knocking on the door and waking them up.

Jorge Jr’s weight loss has attracted the attention of Karnes staff and is attaining his father anxious.” If he doesn’t feed they accuse me of being a bad parent and threaten to take him away from me ,” said Jorge.

A new kind of trauma

Having supposed the family separation was over, Elmer and Jorge were retraumatized on 15 August, when riot-clad Ice policemen separated them and 14 other fathers from their sons again, taking them to a detention facility about two hours away from Karnes.

” It to occur in two in the afternoon, while our sons were at school ,” said Jorge.” We were put into solitary confinement and we were all crying .”

After 28 hours, the men were taken back to Karnes and reunited with their sons.

An Ice spokeswoman said the raid was a response to a “disturbance” involving about 40 humen.” Ice San Antonio deployed additional law enforcement resources to control the situation ,” she said, is proof that 16 of the men were temporarily relocated.” No one was injured during this incident .”

” The infants were sad because they didn’t think they were going to see us again ,” said Jorge.” We were sad, too, for the reasons .”

Now if the men are detected talking in groups of three or more, the guards will transgress them up.

” Then they start asking us questions about what we are talking about. We tell them we are telling each other jokes, sharing our experiences ,” said Elmer.

‘We don’t want to be here any more’

After months behind bars, the parents are losing hope. They would still prefer to remain in the United States, but want to fight their cases outside detention.

The Flores Settlement, the court ruling that governs the therapy of child migrants, is supposed to limit detention for immigrant children to 20 days but Ice takes the position that because the parents are appealing their cases and want to remain with their sons, they must remain in detention, said Manoj Govindaiah, the family detention legal director of Raices, a legal aid centre for migrants.

A
A son from Honduras watches a movie at a detention facility in McAllen, Texas. Photograph: John Moore/ Getty Images

” What Ice is doing is completely arbitrary ,” Govindaiah said. Some families are released, while others are not. Since family separation happened the beginning of this year, Raices has six faculty lawyers and six legal assistants working at Karnes.

” It’s nearly impossible to explain things to our clients, many of whom are fleeing violence with their children and all of whom have experienced even more traumatization because of family separation and zero tolerance ,” Govindaiah said.

Elmer is losing hope.” We’ve been here since the end of July ,” he said.” I don’t want to be here any more. We don’t want to be here any more .”

Jorge Jr was desperate not to expend his birthday- which came and went at the end of September- in Karnes.

” And yet we’re still being detained ,” Jorge said, unsure if he’ll receive asylum or be deported.” This is punishing our children. We are going to die from sadness in here .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

5 reasons why we should care about the crisis in Venezuela

( CNN) You’ve assured the news reports: the protests in the streets, the long lines at the stores. But you may not have paid much attention to the chaos gripping Venezuela.

How are events in a socialist country of 30 million people, thousands of miles away, relevant to their own lives, you may have wondered.
Here are five reasons for the Venezuelan crisis should matter to all of us.

It’s making thousands of new refugees

The food and medicine deficits, rising prices, political instability and violence have forced tens of thousands of Venezuelans to flee. They’re now the top asylum seekers in the US, ahead of citizens from China, Mexico, Guatemala and El Salvador. It’s the first time Venezuelans have topped the list.
More than 21,600 Venezuelans have sought asylum so far in the 2017 fiscal year. That’s nearly four times higher than in 2015, when 5,605 Venezuelans applied for asylum.
“The US has enjoyed being in a peaceful, democratic neighborhood for many years … and this could change that, ” said Fabiana Perera, a Foreign Policy Interrupted fellow at George Washington University.
Caracas, she added, “is only a three-hour flight from Miami.
A wave of new asylum-seekers would not be welcome in the current American political climate, said Christopher Reeve Linares, a freelance journalist who has covered Venezuela.
“There is a rise in xenophobia in the US, and a inundation of Venezuelans from across social strata into the country risk local backlash and becoming pawns and scapegoats of US legislators, ” he said.

It’s an assault on democracy – and that’s troubling

Many commentators say what’s gone on politically in Venezuela over the last two years is nothing less than a democratic mugging.
President Nicols Maduro stacked the Supreme Court with his supporters to block any impeachment endeavors after the country’s opposition leaders won a majority of seats in the National Assembly in 2015.
Then the Maduro-backed Supreme Court briefly attempted to dissolve the National Assembly and acquire its legislative powers, triggering a wave of protests that have continued almost daily since March. More than 100 people have been killed.

Why Venezuela is in crisis

What the helicopter attack tells us about the Venezuela crisis

( CNN) Downtown Caracas was the scene of what authorities say was an audacious attemptto destabilize the faltering government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro this week.

It was the latest, and perhaps most bizarre chapter in Venezuela’s months-long downward spiral.
Near daily conflicts between government forces and protesters have paralyzed the South American country. At least 80people have died since the beginning of this latest round of civil unrest.

Venezuelan assembly leader: I was attacked

Venezuela on verge of collapse

Canadian girl use own obituary to rail against fat-shaming

Ellen Maud Bennett called out the medical profession for only offering weight loss supporting after being diagnosed with cancer

A Canadian woman has used her obituary to call out the medical profession for what she described as “fat-shaming”, in a letter addressed urging society to better address the health fears of overweight women.

Ellen Maud Bennett, 64, died in May, after she was diagnosed with terminal cancer in the west coast city of Victoria.

In an obituary published in the Times Colonist newspaper, Bennett’s family describes Bennett as a remarkable female with an unforgettable character whose career spanned from a stint on Parliament Hill to television and movie.

But the obituary also railed against how she had been treated when she attempted medical help.

” A final message Ellen wanted to share was about the fat-shaming she endured from the medical profession ,” it noted .

” Over the past few years of feeling unwell she attempted out medical intervention and no one offered any support or suggestions beyond weight loss ,” it continued.” Ellen’s dying wish was that women of size stimulate her demise matter by advocating strongly for their health and not accepting that fat is the only relevant health issue .”

Since it was published earlier this month, the obituary has struck a chord with many on social media, racking up shares and responses.

Some pointed to similar experiences.” It wasn’t until I started taking interest in my sister’s health as an adult and took her to my doctor that we observed she had several ailments that had been untreated for years because doctors refused to treat her and maintain telling her to lose weight first ,” wrote one person on Twitter .

Another accused the emphasis placed on her weight of eclipsing a degenerative genetic condition. After a decade of being told to shed pounds, she was 43 years of age when she was finally properly diagnosed, she said, adding:” The medical community sucks for heavy girls .”

Others argued that this kind of treatment often pushes people away from health care, including those who may already be marginalised from society.” My mother loathes going to the doctor because of the fat-shaming ,” wrote one man. He added:” She also had to stop going for strolls because randos in passing autoes would hurl abuse at her .”

The obituary noted that she filled her last days with humour, love and requests for fresh lobster, peonies and the” perfect shrimp wonton soup”- and also recognised those who had treated her differently.

” Ellen’s household would like to extend our gratitude to the amazing squad of angels at the Victoria Hospice who dedicated her the respect and kindness she needed and deserved ,” it noted.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Oprah Winfrey Just Became One of the World’s 500 Richest People

Oprah Winfrey has notched another milestone.

The media mogul’s luck made a record$ 4 billion on Monday to stimulate her the first black female entrepreneur on the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, a ranking of the world’s 500 richest people. She’s at 494, just behind Mark Cuban and Ross Perot.

Winfrey, 64, can largely thank the performance of Weight Watchers International Inc. for this latest marker. Her fortune has increased $427 million so far this year as the company’s share cost has more than doubled. The weight-loss firm has mounted a comeback since 2015, when she bought a stake and agreed to pitch the brand.

The bulk of her luck comes from ownership of the Oprah Winfrey Show, which had a 25 -year run. The founder of her own cable network, Winfrey merely announced a partnership with Apple Inc. to make original programs and content.

Her inclusion brings the total number of women on the listing to 65 and the number of female entrepreneurs to six.

Venezuelan food crisis reflected in skipped snacks and weight loss

( CNN) A mother contemplates how she does her food shopping amid famines and high inflation in Venezuela: Whatever is cheapest in the season is what her children eat, replacing one thing for another and in much smaller sections than before.

“What I have at home is enough to give them a plain arepa, and it’s very little for each one, ” the woman, Grecia Gonzalez, told CNN en Espaol, referring to the traditional white corn cakes. “And for me, I don’t am worried about going without eating. As a mom you’re always thinking about feeding( your children ). “
New data regarding an annual national survey by three of Venezuela’s major universities and other research groups has found that Gonzalez’s experience is becoming more common in the oil-rich South American country.