Noom competitor OurPath rebrands as Second nature, creates $10 M Series A

Back in 2018, OurPath emerged as a startup in the U.K. tackling the problem of diabetes. The company helped clients fight the disease, and raised a$ 3 million round of funding by combining advice from health experts with tracking technology via a smartphone app to help people build healthy habits and lose weight.

Now rebranded as Second Nature, it has raised a fresh $10 million in Series A funding.

New investors include Uniqa Ventures, the venture capital fund of Uniqa, a European insurance group, and the founders of mySugr, the digital diabetes management platform, which was acquired by health giant Roche.

The round also procured the backing of existing investors including Connect and Speedinvest, two European seed funds, and Bethnal Green Ventures, the early-stage Impact investor, as well as angels including Taavet Hinrikus, founder of TransferWise.

This new injection takes the total investment in the company to $ 13 million.

Competitors to the company include Weight Watchers and Noom, which provides a similar program and has raised $ 114.7 million.

Second Nature claims to have a different, more intensive and personalized approach to create habit change. The startup claims 10,000 of its participants exposed an average weight loss of 5.9 kg at the 12 -week mark. Separate peer-reviewed scientific data published by the company showed that much of this weight-loss is sustained at the six-month and 12 -month mark.

Under its former guise as OurPath, the startup was the first” lifestyle change program” to be commissioned by the NHS for diabetes management.

Second Nature was founded in 2015 by Chris Edson and Mike Gibbs, former healthcare strategy consultants, who designed the program to provide people with personalized support in order to construct lifestyle changes.

Participants receive a situate of “smart” scales and an activity tracker that links with the app, allowing them to track their weight loss progress and daily step count. They are placed in a peer supporting group of 15 people starting simultaneously. Each group is coached by a qualified dietitian or nutritionist, who offer participants with daily 1:1 advice, subsistence and motive via the app. Throughout the 12 -week program, people have access to healthy recipes and daily articles encompassing topics like dinner planning, how to sleep better and overcoming emotional eating.

Gibbs said: “Our goal at Second Nature is to solve obesity. We need to rise above the confusing health misinformation to provide clarity about what’s really important: altering habits. Our new brand and investment will help us realize that.”

Philip Edmondson-Jones, investment administrator at Beringea, who led the investment and joins the board of directors of Second Nature, said: “Healthcare systems are struggling to cope with spiraling rates of obesity and associated maladies, which are projected to cost the global economy $ 1.2 trillion annually by 2025. Second Nature’s pioneering approach to lifestyle alter empowers people to address these conditions.”

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Canadian woman uses own obituary to rail against fat-shaming

Ellen Maud Bennett called out the medical profession for only offering weight loss support after being diagnosed with cancer

A Canadian woman has employed her obituary to call out the medical profession for what she described as ” fat-shaming”, in a message urging society to better address the health concerns of overweight women.

Ellen Maud Bennett, 64, died in May, after she was diagnosed with terminal cancer in the west coast city of Victoria.

In an obituary be made available in the Times Colonist newspaper, Bennett’s household describes Bennett as a remarkable woman with an unforgettable character whose career spanned from a stint on Parliament Hill to television and film.

But the obituary also railed against how she had been treated when she tried medical assistance.

” A final message Ellen wanted to share was about the fat-shaming she suffered from the medical profession ,” it noted .

” Over the past few years of feeling unwell she attempted out medical intervention and no one offered any support or suggestions beyond weight loss ,” it continued.” Ellen’s dying wishing was that women of size stimulate her death matter by advocating strongly for their health and not accepting that fat is the only relevant health issue .”

Since it was published earlier this month, the obituary has hit a chord with many on social media, racking up shares and responses.

Some pointed to similar experiences.” It wasn’t until I started taking interest in my sister’s health as an adult and took her to my doctor that we find she had several ailments that had been untreated for years because physicians refused to treat her and maintained telling her to lose weight first ,” wrote one person on Twitter .

Another accused the focus on her weight of eclipsing a degenerative genetic condition. After a decade of being told to shed pounds, she was 43 years of age when she was finally properly diagnosed, she said, adding:” The medical community sucks for heavy females .”

Others argued that this kind of treatment often pushes people away from health care, including those who may already be marginalised from society.” My mother loathes going to the doctor because of the fat-shaming ,” wrote one man. He added:” She also had to stop going for walkings because randos in passing automobiles would lunge abuse at her .”

The obituary noted that she filled her last days with humour, love and requests for fresh lobster, peonies and the “perfect shrimp wonton soup”- and also recognised those who had treated her differently.

” Ellen’s household would like to extend our gratitude to the amazing squad of angels at the Victoria Hospice who devoted her the respect and kindness she required and deserved ,” it noted.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Canadian woman employs own obituary to rail against fat-shaming

Ellen Maud Bennett called out the medical profession for only offering weight loss support after being diagnosed with cancer

A Canadian woman has used her obituary to call out the medical profession for what she described as ” fat-shaming”, in a message urging society to better address the health concerns of overweight women.

Ellen Maud Bennett, 64, died in May, after she was diagnosed with terminal cancer in the west coast city of Victoria.

In an obituary be made available in the Times Colonist newspaper, Bennett’s family describes Bennett as a remarkable female with an unforgettable character whose career spanned from a stint on Parliament Hill to television and film.

But the obituary also railed against how she had been treated when she tried medical assistance.

” A final message Ellen wanted to share was about the fat-shaming she endured from the medical profession ,” it noted .

” Over the past few years of feeling unwell she attempted out medical intervention and no one offered any subsistence or suggestions beyond weight loss ,” it continued.” Ellen’s dying hope was that women of size stimulate her death matter by advocating strongly for their health and not accepting that fat is the only relevant health issue .”

Since it was published earlier this month, the obituary has hit a chord with many on social media, racking up shares and responses.

Some pointed to similar experiences.” It wasn’t until I started taking interest in my sister’s health as an adult and took her to my doctor that we determined she had several ailments that had been untreated for years because physicians refused to treat her and kept telling her to lose weight first ,” wrote one person on Twitter .

Another accused the focus on her weight of eclipsing a degenerative genetic condition. After a decade of being told to shed pounds, she was 43 years of age when she was finally properly diagnosed, she said, adding:” The medical community sucks for heavy women .”

Others argued that this kind of treatment often pushes people away from health care, including those who may already be marginalised from society.” My mother loathes going to the doctor because of the fat-shaming ,” wrote one human. He added:” She also had to stop going for strolls because randos in passing autoes would lunge abuse at her .”

The obituary noted that she filled her last days with humour, love and requests for fresh lobster, peonies and the “perfect shrimp wonton soup”- and also recognised those who had treated her differently.

” Ellen’s family would like to extend our gratitude to the amazing team of angels at the Victoria Hospice who gave her the respect and kindness she needed and deserved ,” it noted.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

The Collapse of a $40 Million Nutrition Science Crusade

On Monday night Gary Taubes will board his second transatlantic flight in a week–from Zurich to Aspen–then eventually back to Oakland, where he calls home. The crusading science journalist best known for his beef with Big Sugar is beat after four days of nutrition conference glad-handing. But there’s no rest for the down and out. Taubes is on a desperate money-raising mission for the Nutrition Science Initiative–his nonprofit dedicated to improving the quality of nutrition research.

NuSI( pronounced new-see ) launched in September 2012 with much fanfare, including in the pages of WIRED. It rapidly created more than $ 40 million from big-name donors to facilitate expensive, high-risk studies intended to illuminate the root causes of obesity. Taubes and his cofounder, physician-researcher Peter Attia, contended that nutritional science was so inconsistent because it was so expensive to do right. With a goal of raising an additional $ 190 million, they wanted to fund science that enables you to cut the prevalence of obesity in the US by more than half–and diabetes by 75 percent–by 2025.

Rehabilitating the entire field of nutrition research was always a long shot. But six years in, NuSI is nowhere near achieving its lofty ambitions. In fact, the once-flush organization is break, president-less, and all but gone. It’s been three years since it last tweeted, two years since it’s had a real office; today NuSI consists of two part-time employees and an unpaid volunteer hanging around while Taubes tries to conjure a second act.

Because while he’s nearly out of money, Taubes is not yet out of ideas. This time, though, that might not be enough.

When Taubes and Attia first hatched their “Manhattan Project for nutrition, ” they planned to work on it nights and weekends, crowdsourcing monies from the low-carb corners of the internet. They didn’t think it would be too difficult; between a 2002 New York Times cover story titled “What If It &# x27; s All Been a Big Fat Lie ?” and his best-selling book Good Calories, Bad Calories , Taubes had become the country’s anti-sugar agitator-in-chief. Then, in 2011, Taubes received an email from a former natural gas trader named John Arnold who wanted to help.

In May 2012, just weeks after announcing his and his wife’s new charity aimed at reforming iffy areas of science, the John and Laura Arnold Foundation devoted NuSI a $4.7 million seed to be given to do nutrition research right. In 2013 they followed that up with an additional $ 35.5 million commitment over five years, inducing them NuSI’s lead funder.

At the heart of their mission was the decades-old question of whether all calories are, in fact, created equal. The mainstream view is that it’s simply an excess of calories that makes people fat–no matter whether those calories comes here a bagel or a steak or a bowl of broccoli. Taubes and Attia subscribe to a growing minority posture, dubbed the carbohydrate/ insulin or C/ I hypothesis, that argues obesity is caused by an excess of insulin driving energy into fat stores. In other terms, sugar makes people fat.

Taubes and Attia thought those questions needed a more streamlined research approach to get real answers. So they formed NuSI to funnel fund into a rigorous new situate of studies, while leaving scientists with the experimental independence that would shield their results from bias.

With the Arnold money in hand, Taubes and Attia started recruiting top researchers in 2012 to conduct four initial studies. They purposefully brought on people who disagreed with them, like Kevin Hall, a senior examiner at the NIH’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, whose mathematical models predicted that a low-carb, low-insulin diet would have only a tiny impact on calorie-burning. He would head up one of NuSI’s first studies, dubbed the Energy Balance Consortium.

The EBC’s pilot project would lock 17 overweight men inside metabolic wards for two months, feeding them precisely devised snacks and pricking and prodding to see what happened to their bodies on a low-carb diet. If it stimulated them burn calories faster, a follow-up study would do the same exams on a bigger group of people. If the effect was minimal, researchers would then test the effect of low-carb diets on hunger.

Hall was skeptical they would find anything to support the carbohydrate/ insulin hypothesis. But he was assured by the terms of the contract; NuSI would have no control over the pilot study’s design, operation, or reporting. He could build the study he wanted.

At first, things went according to plan. The EBC researchers met with NuSI quarterly to finalize the study’s design and clinical procedures. NuSI signed a consulting agreement with Dr. Jeff Volek–author of the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living — to create the diets and menus.

By August 2014, the EBC researchers had preliminary results on their 17 volunteers: The data showed “no significant difference” in energy expenditure. That didn’t mean it was a failure; to the researchers, they had succeeded in verifying the methodology before using it in an even bigger, longer study. “We had to work out these rather complex logistics of get common food sources distributed among many institutions, ” says Rudolph Leibel, one of the consortium scientists working on the pilot at Columbia. “It looked like something the Allies would have organized for all the landings on D-Day.”

But when Hall presented the pilot’s outcomes in person to representatives from NuSI at a meeting in Bethesda in September, they were not so rosy-eyed. NuSI wanted to see the data, and it began providing extensive critiques once they had it.

Taubes in particular had issues with many of the study’s designs, which fed participants a “standard American diet” for four weeks before switching them to an extremely low-carb, or ketogenic, regimen with the same amount of calories. It was supposed to get them to a stable weight, or energy balance, to establish a baseline before running keto. But the subjects all lost weight even before they started cutting out carbs. Taubes contended that was because the standard diet didn’t have enough refined sugary liquors to depict median American consumption.

“From my perspective, the pilot was a failure for several reasons, ” Taubes says. “First, it failed to get people in energy balance in the run-in period, and that was a necessary condition to interpret the findings.” In addition, he points out, the design didn’t include a group of non-dieters, and non-randomized trials do not allow for firm conclusions about causality, conditions that everyone in the group knew going in. In his eyes, all the pilot told them was that their method was flawed. “If this was an animal study, they’d have hurled them out, ” he says. “Euthanized them and started over.”

But NuSI had already spend$ 5 million of the Arnold’s money, and everyone was eager to get to the second phase of the study. As they worked out the details through 2015, the relationship between EBC and NuSI continued to fray. “There was not a real team, ” says Eric Ravussin, EBC’s co-principal investigator and director of Pennington’s Nutrition Obesity Research Center. “As scientists we were in agreement over the pilot results and the new protocols, but NuSI had some concerns. It eventually simply became us versus them.”

According to Hall and Ravussin, NuSI began to push back, in a way that they felt jeopardized their ability to do good science. In April, the EBC researchers sent NuSI an email requesting to re-establish their academic freedom.

Emily Waite

As 2015 turned into 2016, the relationship between the EBC researchers, NuSI, and the Arnold Foundation deteriorated even further. At the end of December, Attia quietly resigned from the organization. Sources close to him say he was unhappy being a full-time fund-raiser; he wanted to get back to research.

NuSI scrambled to fill Attia’s position as chairwoman, first with Christopher Ochner, a psychiatrist at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and a few months later with Julie Eckstrand, NuSI’s then-director of clinical operations, who has since left. At the beginning of 2016, NuSI’s yearly contract with the Arnold Foundation was replaced by a series of three-month bridge contracts, with marching orders to downsize. The squad of 15 full-time employees and major contractors shrunk to a skeleton crew that could manage the three remaining studies. NuSI shuttered its San Diego headquarters and became a virtual organization.

Things came to a head at a session in January 2016. In front of John Arnold, NuSI directors Taubes and Mark Friedman openly quarreled with Hall and his colleagues about what was really necessary to run a good study. Hall had had enough. At the end of the session he stepped down from his role with the EBC, citing changing expectations about the structure and practise of the NuSI collaboration.

As the remaining researchers continued to clash with NuSI over the summer about the second phase, the pilot outcomes were finally published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in July. They received a lot of media attention, in no small part because Hall said the pilot, along with another study he’d conducted previously, “basically falsify” the theory that sugar makes people fat. By the end of the summer, the Arnold Foundation had decided not to fund the second phase of the study.

After that, NuSI stopped getting checks from the Arnolds. But the foundation didn’t stop funding research into the carbohydrate/ insulin question. That fall they opened their search to the wider world, putting out a call for proposals for “rigorous research projects that will assess the role that sugar and/ or macronutrients are participating in metabolic the replies and fat accumulation.”

The Arnold Foundation declined to respond to specific questions about how it came to end its relationship with NuSI about $14 million short part of its commitment. A spokesperson emailed the following statement: “This research was designed to answer scientific questions in the fields of nutrition and obesity. While the foundation no longer immediately supports NuSI initiatives, we continue to fund work in the field of nutrition science and remain open to further investments in this area. The NuSI project was a worthwhile effort and remains an important health-related issue for Americans today.”

It’s still too soon to assess what NuSI has added to the nutrition science canon. Outcomes from the two outstanding NuSI-backed studies are due later this year. The fourth and largest one, conducted at Stanford, randomized 600 overweight-to-obese topics into low-fat versus low-carb diets for a year and looked at whether or not their weight loss could be explained by their metabolism or their DNA. Published this February in JAMA , the study detected no differences between the two diets and no meaningful relationship between weight loss and insulin secretion. The most significant finding was that it’s hard to stick to a diet for a whole year.

Obesity docs like Yoni Freedhoff, a prof of family medicine at the University of Ottawa, aren’t astounded that NuSI hasn’t sparked an epistemological revolution. “From the outset, their approach was simply that knowledge will be enough to drive behavior, ” says Freedhoff, who has argued that efforts to prove one diet is better than another do a disservice to patients by implying there’s only one right route to lose weight. He’d love to see research dollars be spent instead on studying how to improve adherence to different eating strategies.

Taubes says the fund-raising trip to Zurich went well, though he won’t share specifics. It could just be the plane lag, or it could be the mental burden of having to sing for his supper, but Taubes audios tired. “I say this to my wife all the time:’ Maybe I’m a quack.’ All quacks are sure they’re right. Isn’t that the defining characteristic of a quack? But the fact is that we money four studies, and the three randomized trials were highly successful operationally. One of these has been published in a top journal with interesting results, and I remain hopeful that we will soon see if the last two studies will move some needles. Our sentences have gotten us this far, and despite some frustrations, these questions still seem vitally important to test.”

Taubes is optimistic that NuSI is just evolving into something a bit more humble. Between its current coffers and the agreements he’s working on, he supposes NuSI can stay afloat for several years, eventually supporting more outside research, though on a much more modest scale. He’s get ideas about instituting a scientific oversight committee to make sure everyone agrees on methods and statistical analysis from the outset.

But he’s also starting to think about how to go back to the life he had before NuSI, living conditions of a journalist. He’s get more articles and volumes he still wants to write , not exclusively about sugar. But it’s tricky. “I know I clearly have conflicts that other journalists only don’t have, and that’s a tightrope I haven’t figured out how to walk yet, ” Taubes says. “This nutrition science crusade–right or wrong–expands easily to fill all the time in my life that can be allotted to work. So I’m going to figure out how to partition time better in the future.”

In between flights and conference dinners, he’s been checking his email for notes on an upcoming article about a new kind of observational study that uses genetic variation to mimic a randomized control trial. While the story isn’t strictly are attributable to nutritional science, Taubes now has the kind of conflicts of interest that make publications wary. He’s working with a new editor and a new outlet after his old editor at Science wouldn’t touch it. Taubes founded NuSI to support objective science; now, it &# x27; s his own objectivity he has to defend.


More Great WIRED Stories

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Biggest loser? Tongan PM challenges Pacific leaders to weight-loss battle

Unusual initiative aims to galvanise citizens of Pacific nations, which have highest obesity rates in the world

The prime minister of Tonga has urged fellow leaders of Pacific nations to join the fight against obesity, proposing they all participate in a year-long weight loss challenge.

Akilisi Pohiva told the Samoa Observer he was going to propose the rivalry when the leaders fulfill at the Pacific Island Forum in Nauru next month.

” We should all get together for a weight loss competition for an entire year, so when we meet the following year we will weigh in again and find who has lost the most ,” he said.

Pohiva pointed to the high rates of childhood obesity in Pacific nations as reason for concern.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Canadian woman utilizes own obituary to rail against fat-shaming

Ellen Maud Bennett called out the medical profession for only offering weight loss support after being diagnosed with cancer

A Canadian woman has use her obituary to call out the medical profession for what she described as ” fat-shaming”, in a message urging society to better address the health concerns of overweight women.

Ellen Maud Bennett, 64, died in May, after she was diagnosed with terminal cancer in the west coast city of Victoria.

In an obituary be made available in the Times Colonist newspaper, Bennett’s household describes Bennett as a remarkable woman with an unforgettable character whose career spanned from a stint on Parliament Hill to television and film.

But the obituary also railed against how she had been treated when she sought medical help.

” A final message Ellen wanted to share was about the fat-shaming she suffered from the medical profession ,” it noted .

” Over the past few years of feeling unwell she sought out medical intervention and no one offered any subsistence or suggestions beyond weight loss ,” it continued.” Ellen’s dying wish was that women of size induce her death matter by advocating strongly for their health and not accepting that fat is the only relevant health issue .”

Since it was published earlier this month, the obituary has struck a chord with many on social media, racking up shares and responses.

Some pointed to similar experiences.” It wasn’t until I started taking interest in my sister’s health as an adult and took her to my doctor that we received she had several ailments that had been untreated for years because physicians refused to treat her and kept telling her to lose weight first ,” wrote one person on Twitter .

Another accused the focus on her weight of eclipsing a degenerative genetic condition. After a decade of being told to shed pounds, she was 43 years of age when she was finally properly diagnosed, she said, adding:” The medical community sucks for heavy girls .”

Others argued that this kind of treatment often pushes people away from health care, including those who may already be marginalised from society.” My mother loathes going to the doctor because of the fat-shaming ,” wrote one man. He added:” She also had to stop going for walks because randos in passing cars would hurl abuse at her .”

The obituary noted that she filled her last days with humour, love and requests for fresh lobster, peonies and the “perfect shrimp wonton soup”- and also recognised those who had treated her differently.

” Ellen’s family would like to extend our gratitude to the amazing squad of angels at the Victoria Hospice who dedicated her the respect and kindness she needed and deserved ,” it noted.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Weight Watchers adds 1m subscribers in a year

Membership increases by 27% but share price dips as revenue growth falls short of forecast

Weight Watchers International continued its impressive subscriber growth through the second largest one-quarter, growing 27.6%, or 1 million, to 4.5 million over the past year, but revenues were less impressive, climbing only 17.6%, to $409.7 m, over a year earlier.

” We have embarked on an exciting journey- from being the global leader in weight management to becoming the world’s partner in wellness ,” said Mindy Grossman, its president and chief executive, in a statement after trading closed on Wall Street.

The dieting power home has been growing strongly since Oprah Winfrey bought a 10% stake in 2015. But investors sounded a note of caution after revenue fell short of expectations, and WTW shares fell from their close at $92.21 to $88.90 in after-hours trading.

Analysts credited the company’s recent success to a strategic change away from mere weight loss and toward products that target holistic wellness.

” Consumers are looking at healthy lifestyles, mental wellbeing ,” Morningstar analyst RJ Hottovy told Investor Business Daily.” Once upon a period, weight management was all about what you feed. Now any activity can be translated into Weight Watchers points .”

While users’ waistlines ought to have shrinking, the firm has enjoyed accelerating sales growth for the past five quarterss, reflecting the involvement of Winfrey and the company’s success in recruiting social media influencers including Hollywood director Kevin Smith and DJ Khaled.

Technology has been key to Weight Watchers’ transformation. Fitness tracking devices now offer members FitPoints for activities such as walking, cleaning or dancing. Those points are then scaled to determine a member’s daily diet allowances.

Kara Anderson, an analyst at B Riley FBR, said Smith’s endorsement of the company soon after suffering a heart attack in February and then chronicling his” wellness journey” and attributing his success to Weight Watchers had been particularly potent.

Despite some frustration with the latest Weight Watchers results, the company is still far above the record low of $3.75 it reached in July 2015 when Winfrey acquired 6.4 m shares and signed on to a five-year bargain to be the face of the firm. By October that year, Winfrey’s five-year deal had already netted her $50 m in share appreciation.

WTW’s shares are up 170% over the past year.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Weight-loss pill hailed as ‘holy grail’ in fight against obesity

US study of 12,000 people shows medication lorcaserin does not increase hazard of serious heart problems

A weight-loss pill has been hailed as a potential “holy grail” in the fight against obesity after a major study demonstrated it did not increase health risks of serious heart problems.

Researchers say lorcaserin is the first time weight-loss drug to be deemed safe for heart health with long-term utilize. Taken twice a day, the drug is an craving suppressant which works by stimulating brain chemicals to induce a feeling of fullness.

A US study ensure 12,000 people who were either obese or overweight given the pills or a placebo- with those who took the drug shedding an average of 4kg( 9lbs) in 40 months.

Further analysis depicted no big differences in exams for heart valve damage.

Tam Fry, of Britain’s National Obesity Forum, said the drug is potentially the “holy grail” of weight-loss medicine.

” I think it is the thing everybody has been looking for ,” he said.

” I think there will be several holy grails, but this is a holy grail and one which has been surely at the back of the mind of a lot of experts for a long time.

” But all of the other things apply- lifestyle change has got to be root and branch one of the purposes of this .”

Prof Jason Halford, an obesity expert at the University of Liverpool, told the Daily Telegraph newspaper that the drug’s accessibility in the UK would depend on whether it is approved by National Health Service regulators.

” We don’t have any appetite suppressants available on the NHS. We have a massive great gap between lifestyle adjustment and surgery ,” he said.

” At the moment you either get support and advice, or you get to surgery – there is nothing in between. This could be widely prescribed if it is approved by Nice( the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence) in the UK .”

The Food and Drug Administration, the US medicines watchdog, approved lorcaserin’s use in some adults in 2012.

The drug has been on sale there since 2013 under the name Belviq, where it expenses $220 – 290( PS155-225) a month.

The study into its long-term consequences was led by Dr Erin Bohula, a cardiovascular medication expert at the Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

” Patient and their doctors have been nervous about use medications to treat obesity and for good reason. There’s a history of these drugs having serious complications ,” she said.

As well as affecting the heart, there are concerns weight-loss narcotics can lead to mental health issues.

The results of the study into lorcaserin were discussed at the European Society of Cardiology in Munich on Sunday and have been published by the New England Journal of Medicine.

The researchers found after one year 39% of participants dedicated lorcaserin had lost at least 5% of their commence weight, compared with 17% of those dedicated placebo. Analysis also depicted fewer people taking lorcaserin developed diabetes, 8.5% compared with 10.3% on placebo.

Tests for heart valve injury were done on 3,270 participants, but no significant differences in rates were identified.

Suicidal guess or behaviour was presented in 21 people taking lorcaserin compared with 11 people dedicated placebo, however those taking the weight-loss medication had a history of depression.

The researchers said:” Among overweight or obese patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease or multiple cardiovascular risk factors who were being treated with dietary and exercise interventions, those who received lorcaserin had better long-term rates of weight loss than those who received placebo at a median follow-up of 3.3 years.

” The higher weight-loss rates were achieved without an accompanying increase in health risks of cardiovascular events .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Diet advice and tiny seats: how to avoid 10 forms of fatphobia

Reactions to the image of model Tess Holliday on the cover-up of Cosmopolitan this month depict fat discrimination is as nasty as ever. Want to avoid it? Heres a simple guide

As a 115 kg( 18 st) girl who refuses to diet, unapologetically wears short shorts and feeds tiramisu, I have experienced and witnessed a lot of fatphobia. This is a form of bigotry that equates fatness with ugliness, inferiority and immorality. In my new book You Have the Right to Remain Fat, I talk a great deal about how being fat has shaped my life, how fatphobia has multiple dimensions and how it does not just move outward- from us to others. It moves inwards- from our culture to ourselves.

Researchers who study stigma have found it often leads to depression and anxiety, as well as decreased access to employment, friendship, romantic opportunities and a sense that one is not welcome in the wider culture. Fatphobia has shown itself in unexpected routes in my own life. I’ve determined, for example, that men often approach me with an interest in starting a private sexual relationship but not a public romance, and that it has been harder to find jobs with opportunities for promotion because employers associate fatness with laziness. I argue for the right of every person- regardless of their size- to live a life free from discrimination.

Here are 10 of the most common the case of an fatphobia that personally affect me and many others- with some advice about how to combat them.

1.’ Wow, haven’t you lost weight !’

I remember going to the family doctor when I was 11, having spent the summer starving myself. I’d merely eaten toast and lettuce and exerted two to three hours a day in the hope I could spend my final year of primary and secondary schools free from constant teasing. When the doctor considered me he did not ask how a child had lost weight so rapidly or express alarm that I might be sick. He congratulated me, told me to keep up the good work and said if I lost more weight I might be able to date one of his sons. One girl I worked with told me she had developed a drug habit in order to maintain her low weight, and had never received more compliments than at the height of her craving. Weight loss is always considered positive , no matter how it’s attained.” You’ve lost weight !” seems innocuous, but it actually makes an uncomfortable sense that people are surveilling and judging your body.

Make it a rule not to use speech that focuses on your own or others’ weight. We have no idea what someone is going through, whether they are dealing with body disgrace or trying to heal from an eating disorder. When we stop using these sorts of speech wholly, we create an environment in which people of all sizes can coexist without a sense of weight surveillance.

2. Selfies taken from above

The religious avoidance of the double chin in selfies- with the camera always held 20 cms above the photographer’s head, with the face tilted just so- sends a constant message about who and what is worth documenting.

Try documenting yourself at different angles. Remember you are photographing a special feeling or an important moment, and that you are trying to capture a two-dimensional image of a complex person.

3. Tiny seats in restaurants

Many fat people have anxiety about seating at restaurants. Will there be booths where the space between the table and the seat is fixed? Will the chairs be wobbly little metal ones held up by the furniture equivalent of tube cleaners? This anxiety leads to many fat people opting out of social dining situations.

The restrictive size of seating- and this applies strongly to desks in classrooms too- was a good example of what’s called structural fatphobia. It is not a person hurting all persons immediately. It is what happens when we create structures based on presumptions about which bodies belong in which places.

If you’re going for dinner with a fat friend, check images of the restaurant’s interior to make sure there are sturdy chairs without armrests, and non-stationary tables and chairs if cramped booths are the main seating option.

Vigie Vigie Tovar. Photo: Author

4. Romantic discrimination

We chalk up a lot of our romantic decisions to evolutionary biology, but the truth is our partner option is highly influenced by social expectations and ideals. If we lived in Mauritania, for example, where fatness is the beauty ideal, we would have no difficulty determining “biological” rationalisation for that attraction. We are taught who is beautiful, and get social cues about who to avoid choosing as a partner.

It is useful to remember that our first reaction to another person is often a result of how “weve been” trained, socially, to react. We can take a moment to ask ourselves whether constructing romantic decisions in this style is getting us what we truly want. I have found that in romance I really want a sense of security, shared values and overall chemistry. But we are not trained to seek out those qualities. We are trained to seek out people who adhere to one-dimensional, culturally set standards. Attraction is wonderfully complex and we miss out when we only experience it along one axis- how someone measures up to beauty standards.

5. Aggressivenes on public transport and planes

Most instances of overt fat loathe happens to me on public transport. I avoid busier times on the train( peak passenger hours and when teenagers get out of school) because I have found I am much more likely to be accosted verbally in a packed carriage. Once, a group of teenagers sat in front of me and began taking selfies. I watched them huddle together and start laughing. One of them tip-off the phone and I watched that the issue is laughing at a zoomed-in image of my face. Another day, I asked a thin female who was lying across three seats on a develop platform if I could sit down; she called me a fat bitch. In this second instance, another thin girl stood up for me and proceeded to tell her off. I will always be grateful. It is important to interrupt instances of intolerance because we do not want to live in a world where anyone can be harassed because of who they are or what they look like.

6. Professional and formalwear do not come in plus size

A fat activist once said attire was the alphabet we used to express ourselves- and fat people have fewer letters. When applying for jobs, I determined it impossible to find well-made professional clothing that I liked in my sizing. This reduced my confidence. I could see my smaller colleagues were better garmented and it built me question whether I belonged. A friend of mine virtually relapsed into her eating disorder when she was preparing to get married; she had so much difficulty discovering a dress that she questioned whether she deserved to be a bride. Business suits, tuxes and wedding gowns are harder to come by in larger size. This sends a message about who gets to participate in important cultural moments and who belongs in the business world.

7. Fashion double standards

Beyond formalwear, style creates other problems. Thin people and fat people can be wearing the same item of attire and be perceived differently. A thin person wearing yoga gasps may be presumed to be heading to the gym, while a fat person may be perceived as sloppy. A thin person in a tank top is not noteworthy; a fat person in a tank top is scandalous or brave. In a 2017 Allure article, the plus-size model Ashley Graham declared she was tired of being called brave for wearing a bathing suit. In 2016, a woman from Florida called Kelley Markland came home to a note from a stranger that declared:” Women who weighed 300 pounds should not wear yoga pants .”

Model Model Ashley Graham. Photograph: Evan Agostini/ Invision/ AP

The solution to this one is simple: we all need to wear what we want. People who feel anxious about what other people are wearing should interrogate their beliefs and stop acting on their bigotry.

8. Dread of being seen in public with fat people

Many people, fat and thin, avoid being friends with or dating fat people for fear of public criticism. I once gratified someone who quite literally adored my body, but when it was time to take our casual hangouts into the public sphere he told me he did not have the balls to be seen with me. I objective the relationship, and have since vetted my dates in order to avoid partners like him.

The journal Appetite published the” fat suit study” in 2014. This involved a professional performer going out in public on different occasions, with and without a fat suit, and serving herself either a small amount of pasta and a large amount of salad or a large amount of pasta and a small amount of salad. It was found that participants served and ate a greater amount of pasta when she was wearing the prosthesis than when “shes not”, and it was therefore posited that being near a fat person inspires people to eat more. This various kinds of inquiry legitimises the sense that proximity to fatness bears the threat of contamination.

It is an unfortunate reality that we are taught to avoid being assured with people who differ from the norm- whether because of body size, gender, disability or even way. We all lose when we live like this. It is important for fat people to recognise that we are worthy and deserve to develop borders when it comes to the kind of behaviour we will accept. And it is important for thin people who are afraid of being watched with fat people to interrogate their fear and ask themselves what they lose when they deny someone else’s humanity.

9. Unsolicited weight-loss advice

Just the other day, a complete stranger came up to me while I was sipping a latte in public and told me to avoid pork so I could reduce my weight. This behaviour is jarring- and more often comes from well-meaning people we know. Though I am no longer friends with people who offer me weight-loss advice, there were many years in which I detected myself on the receiving aim of incessant suggestions from my grandmother, my extended family at vacation parties, the woman who sold me coffee every day, educators, nurses and doctors. Trust me. Fat people have tried every kind of diet; this kind of advice only makes us feel alienated.

10. Medical discrimination

Often doctors refuse to treat fat people properly, insisting that if we lose weight the issue- whatever it is- will simply go away. I have gone to the doctor with a sore throat and left with a prescription for weight loss. When I edited an anthology in 2012, a woman submitted a narrative about going to her doctor with distrusts she might have a serious uterine problem- doctors diagnosed her on sight as having polycystic ovary disorder without examining her. Three years later she found out she had cancer, which could have been treated much earlier if her health had been taken seriously. I met a woman who was pressured to get weight loss surgery as a teen and now, because of the route that kind of surgery can affect bones and teeth, she deals with huge dental bills. Medical discrimination leads to delayed diagnosis and therapy, and poorer health in the long run. It has to stop, for everyone’s sake.

Virgie Tovar’s You Have the Right to Remain Fat is published by Melville House at PS7. 99. To order a copy for PS6. 79 go to guardianbookshop.com or call 0330 333 6846.

Study: Seasons have little effect on dieting app reporting but the day of week does

If you’ve gotten three apps and a Fitbit so you can get skinnier this year, don’t fret so much about summer beach season or holiday weight gain. Instead, worry about Thursday.

Researchers at University of South Carolina found that self-reporting of food was integral to weight loss but that self-reporters often fell off, seemingly around the holidays. “A key question we wanted to answer is what impact the holiday season has on individuals’ efforts to monitor their calorie intake, ” said lead author Christine A. Pellegrini, PhD.

They gave a dieting app to a group of 32 obese adults and asked them to self-report over various seasons. The app could tell when they reported intake, letting the researchers to see when folks stopped reporting.

From the release 😛 TAGEND

After analysis of the data, a reduction in the number of foods reported by each person was watched with each successive day in the study. There was also a weekend effect such that participants reported significantly fewer foods between Thursday and Sunday relative to Monday. The study, however, determined that although more food was reported in January, an overall seasonality impact was not observed.

“Adults generally gain weight during the holidays and self-monitoring can help to manage weight during this period, ” reported Pellegrini. “Weight loss is a common New Year’s resolution and may explain the increased number of foods reported in January; however, the typical pattern of self-monitoring during the holidays is not well established.”

The researchers considered food self-reporting fall off on a weekly basis between Thursday and Sunday which suggests that we are good at reporting what we eat at the beginning of the week but, as opportunities to defraud enter our weekend radar, we slow down considerably.

The bottom line? “Based on this study’s findings, providing these promptings on weekends may improve adherence to self-monitoring recommendations, ” wrote the researchers. Basically someone has to remind us not to pig out on our days of rest.

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